Creative Ideas Put the Fun Back Into Marketing

Marketing doesn’t seem to be much fun anymore. Everyone’s buried in spreadsheets and meetings all day long. Sometimes it’s hard to remember why you got into marketing in the first place.

All these web analytics are wonderful, but it’s easy to get bogged down in number crunching and overlook the most important aspect of any campaign: creative.
Creative Ideas Put Fun Back Into Marketing
Marketing strategists warn not to put too much faith in creative ideas. Just state your product’s benefits clearly, they advise. Make sure you have your keywords identified. Keep messages plain and simple. The robots don’t understand creative ideas. Test one (mediocre) idea against another for success.

Well I’m here to tell you that shouldn’t believe them.

Set New Goals

The fastest way to get out from under your spreadsheets and beat the doldrums is to set some brash new marketing goals for your company, like these:

Beat Google’s Robot…again – when Google changes the SEO rules, you need additional help to ensure good search results.

Spike the Clickthru Rate – forget rambling emails. Life is too short for your prospects to respond to long, vague promises.

Bury the Competition – no need for a shovel. With strong positioning, you don’t compete with other companies; you leave them in the dust.

Burst the Pipeline – why settle for run-of-the-mill results? Develop drop-dead gorgeous campaigns that produce, sales record-smashing, shouting out loud for joy (isn’t it about time) results.

Crack the Code – is this the year you make sense of your analytics and discover actionable insights?

Marry Creative Ideas with Strong Positioning

Now marry these goals with fresh creative ideas. We all know that the real marketing battles take place in your prospects’ minds. And you can become top of mind if, and only if, you can catapult your brand past your competitors and into your prospects’ heads first.

Well, the key to speeding your message into your audience’s head, right past an early entry competitor, before anyone else is…you guessed it…creativity.

To capture and maintain a presence in your audience’s mind, you have to present not only a compelling message but also a memorable, consistent personality, voice and point of view — all creative issues.

The world is flat

I don’t want to burst anyone’s bubble, but no matter what you do strategically, you still have to compete with a zillion other messages.

And you have only two choices: You can repeat messages over and over and over again until they finally sink in. Or you can say them in such a fresh, new, surprising and relevant way that people can’t forget them. The latter approach is more effective and costs less.

Frequency is maddeningly slow

Without creative impact, your message is relegated to the slow seep of frequency. You wait patiently for nature to take its course and for your selling points to eventually seep in. If they seep at all. Nowadays, it simply takes too long.

In the meantime, a competitor can zip past you into your audience’s head with a new idea or benefit. Or even take a position or attribute or key differentiator away from you. All they need is the right strategy and the powerful engine of creative impact.

Creativity delivers impact

Rather than sending out interruptive, self-centered messages that tell people what they should believe about your products, send them something impactful. Impact is a direct result of how original, surprising and relevant your creative is. Despite the tremendous communications clutter out there, people will always stop, notice and connect with a message that’s fresh and direct and engaging and human. Always.

It’s Not for the timid

Creating communications like this means running risks.

If an email campaign, microsite, or product promotion is provocative, interesting and intriguing, it will create an adverse comment or two along the way — especially inside your company. That’s when you know you’ve got something.

In fact, if the idea doesn’t make some company executive sweat a little, than you’re probably not saying anything worth saying.